Fibre – the latest “superfood”

Fibre – yes I know, it’s not the most exciting thing in the world but a major study has been investigating how much fibre we really need to be eating and has found there are huge health benefits when we eat more.

  • It reduces the chances of debilitating heart attacks and strokes as well as life-long diseases such as type-2 diabetes.
  • It helps keep your weight, blood pressure and cholesterol levels down.
  • It’s cheap and widely available in the supermarket.
  • It makes us feel fuller and can help digestion and prevent constipation.

The researchers for this study, based at the University of Otago, in New Zealand, and the University of Dundee say people should be eating a minimum of 25g of fibre per day. “The evidence is now overwhelming and this is a game-changer that people have to start doing something about it,” one of the researchers, Professor John Cummings, has told BBC News.

The NHS recommends we should increase our fibre intake to 30g a day as part of a healthy balanced diet. So what does 30g of fibre actually mean?

To increase your fibre intake you could:

  • Choose a higher-fibre breakfast cereal such as plain wholewheat biscuits (like Weetabix) or plain shredded whole grain (like Shredded wheat), or porridge as oats are also a good source of fibre.
  • Go for wholemeal or granary breads, or higher fibre white bread, and choose wholegrains like wholewheat pasta, bulgur wheat or brown rice.
  • Go for potatoes with their skins on, such as a baked potato or boiled new potatoes.
  • Add pulses and legumes such as beans, lentils or chickpeas to stews, soups, curries and salads.
  • Include plenty of vegetables with meals, either as a side dish or added to sauces, stews or curries.
  • Have some fresh or dried fruit, or fruit canned in natural juice for dessert. Because dried fruit is sticky, it can increase the risk of tooth decay, so it’s better if it is only eaten as part of a meal, rather than as a between-meal snack.
  • For snacks, try fresh fruit, vegetable sticks, rye crackers, oatcakes and unsalted nuts or seeds.

Did you know? A small handful of nuts can have up to 3g of fibre. Always choose unsalted nuts, such as plain almonds, without any added sugars.

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How a personal trainer can help you get fitter, FASTER!

Welcome to 2019 – it’s that time of year again! Are you looking for extra motivation to reach a particular goal? Perhaps you simply don’t like the gym environment? Or you need support coming back to exercise after a long break?

Whatever your current physical condition, fitness levels or personal goals, one-to-one sessions with a dedicated personal trainer can help you to focus on the things that matter:

  • To set realistic but challenging goals,
  • To track your physical progress,
  • To improve your health and wellbeing,
  • Increase your energy levels,
  • Change your body composition,
  • Discover extra motivation and confidence.

Personal training is about breaking the barriers to help you actively achieve your personal goals, and beyond. Here are some of the different ways a Personal Trainer can help you to win your fitness battles:

1. A constant point of contact

A Personal Trainer will provide a constant point of contact to motivate, inspire and support you. Whatever your questions, goals or concerns, your trainer will provide an educated and qualified answer to help you move forward successfully whenever you need them. Having a PT is a great way to make sure you get out the door in the first place! Most people feel more of a sense of responsibility if they have booked an appointment with a PT.

2. A tailored and evolving programme

Your Personal Trainer will create a unique programme that you can follow either with them or on your own. Your PT should consider your lifestyle, any injuries you may have or any concerns before developing a programme to suit your life.

You can reassess your programme at any time if you feel like you’re getting bored or you’d like to challenge yourself more.

3. Exercising using the correct technique

In metafit we have a mantra – quality of exercise not the quantity – technique wins over every time. How you perform exercises can have a huge effect on how effective that exercise is and also on your safety. The worst thing you can do is copy what other people are doing – they may be performing exercises specific to their own requirements that don’t match with your own. Whilst it may look easy to copy what someone else is doing at the gym or on a video, it’s also easy to develop poor technique and that is something that I work hard to avoid with all my clients.

A Personal Trainer will set a programme that is tailored to you and attend training sessions with you to provide guidance and ensure that you are able to perform the exercises correctly.

4. Clever motivation

People often struggle with motivation after the first few weeks in a gym but a Personal Trainer will help you set achievable goals for each stage of your training.

One of the most common mistakes people make is setting their overall goal without also setting smaller incremental and achievable targets along the way. Achieving these smaller targets will spur you on as you continue your training and will make you more likely to succeed. If one of your goals is to run your first marathon, for example, you might want to focus first on running a 5k, then 10k, then 15k etc.

Your Personal Trainer will be able to break down your goals and monitor your progress along the way, offering helpful and constructive advice if you’re falling behind and giving you praise and encouragement when you’re doing well.

For more information on personal training and your individual needs and expectations, please do contact me for a chat. I offer one-to-one personal training sessions for all clients no matter what your current fitness levels are.

Why exercise is GOOD for your joints

As a fitness instructor I have a responsibility to all my class participants to provide a safe workout environment and to avoid injury wherever possible. Quite often I might hear “lunges are bad for my knees!” and similar comments about other exercises. Sound familiar? It’s a common reason people avoid exercises like running or weight training or some fitness classes. But this assumption that exercise damages your joints has been found to be false. In fact, studies conducted over the past decade have shown that exercise helps to both BUILD healthy cartilage and to build SUPPORT around the joints, keeping them stronger for longer.

 

Building strong cartilage in your joints

Arthritis happens when the cartilage that cushions your joints wears away leaving bone rubbing on bone, which causes pain and discomfort. This isn’t the result of exercise, but of injury and constant low-level damage over time. Research has shown that exercise can actually reinforce cartilage.

Your joints are surrounded by a thin piece of tissue connected to your blood supply called the synovial membrane. This membrane produces the fluid that lubricates your joints. Cartilage has no independent blood supply, so instead, it gets its nutrients from this fluid. When exercising your blood pumps faster around your body, providing the membrane with a plentiful supply of nutrients which are infused into the fluid. What’s more, running and other high-impact exercises, have been shown to force this nutrient-rich fluid into the cartilage, keeping it healthy.

NOTE: Of course, if you already suffer from joint pain, high-impact exercises that aggravate this pain should be avoided, at least in the short term, but there’s plenty of exercises that I can show you that will help to build strength in your joints.

Muscles and ligaments – your joints’ support network

Your knees, hips and other joints rely on a supportive network of muscles and ligaments to keep them sturdy. So exercises that build these muscles and strengthen the ligaments will strengthen your joints, making you less prone to injury in the long run.

Strength training uses weight to gradually build muscle tone. If you’re new to exercise, you should begin with bodyweight exercises, working your way onto weight machines, which provide stability while you train, and then move onto free weights such as kettlebells or dumbbells.

It’s worthwhile asking a personal trainer for advice, particularly if you have specific injuries or conditions.

How exercise can relieve pain in the joints

An added benefit of exercise is it can help to prevent and relieve pain in your joints. Building strength in your joints can help improve your posture and prevent a cascade of injuries as a result, and the more you move, the less stiff and fatigued you’ll feel.

Exercise can also affect your mental outlook, flooding your brain’s receptors with ‘feel good’ endorphins which both make you feel happier and change your perception of pain. You might find that you’re more motivated and that pain becomes more manageable after exercise.

Exercises to strengthen and mobilise joints

It’s tempting to give up on exercise when you experience pain in your joints.  After all, you don’t want to make it feel worse. Here’s a great workout from Stephen Macconville, the Joint Pain Programme Director at Nuffield Health that is clinically devised for use by people with joint pain. These six basic exercises each have a progression and a regression (18 exercises in total), to suit your individual level of fitness.

Feel free to contact me for more details of workouts that will suit you. I offer personal training and one-to-one sessions where we can build a tailor made workout that is perfect for you.

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Four health hacks that will change your life

Dr Rangan Chatterjee is a physician, author, television presenter and podcaster. He is probably best known for his TV show Doctor in the House and for being the resident doctor on BBC One’s Breakfast Show. Here I am sharing his article that was recently featured on BBC Radio 5 Live where he shares his philosophy about the ‘four pillars of health’: food, movement, sleep and relaxation.

Every part our body affects pretty much every other part. By making small, achievable changes in the four key areas of your life, you can create and maintain good health – and avoid illness. What matters most is balance across all the things you do.

The twelve hour eating window

If changing your diet and cutting foods out seems intimidating, Dr Rangan suggests an easier option: eat all your food within a 12 hour window. “Can you get more benefits if you go stricter? Yes some people might be able to! But I say if you can do 12 hours a day, tick it off, and move on to another recommendation. Try and get that balance.”

He says, “It’s a very simple change that I’ve seen be transformative for people.”

Five minute strength training

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In our busy lives, it’s often hard to motivate ourselves to find time to go to the gym or go for a run, but Dr Rangan says that just five minutes of strength training twice a week can be really valuable.

“Strength training is very much undervalued in society. We talk about moving more and cardio but we neglect that our muscle mass is one of the strongest predictors of how we’re going to be when we age. Lean muscle mass is so important. Yet when we hit 30, we can lose three to five per cent of our muscle mass every ten years and that rate accelerates after the age of 50.”

Spend time in natural daylight

Good sleep is something we often overlook in our lives, but making sure we have enough high quality sleep can make our lives and health so much better. Dr Rangan has a lot of tips for getting better sleep, but one that you might not have considered is whether you’re getting enough light in the day.

Our bodies need to see different light at day and night to keep our internal clocks working. He says people should be especially aware of this in the winter months. “Many people are leaving the house in the dark, getting to work in the dark, being inside all day, and then going home in the dark.”

He suggests taking twenty minutes in your day to spend some time in natural daylight, and you may find that you wake up the next morning more refreshed.

Make time for some ‘me time’

Stress is often a part of our daily lives, and unfortunately, our technology can be partially to blame for this.

Dr Rangan says, “You get up in bed, the alarm is blaring. So you’ve gone from this nice, peaceful, restful slumber, suddenly there’s a blaring alarm clock. You’re looking at your phone, and there’s a whole ton of blue light, and alarm notifications going on…

For many of us, that continues all day and often that’s still going on just before we’re in bed at night; we’re still looking. And so we’ve just got no down time any more.”

His solution is to have at least 15 minutes a day of ‘me-time’. This should be something you do for yourself, that you don’t feel guilty about doing and that doesn’t involve your smartphone. Doing this can lower your stress levels and let you decompress without worrying about your phone.

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Are you REALLY doing HIIT?

Love love love this article from Metafit Australia and simply had to share! There are many people who seem to think that back to back so-called High Intensity workouts are the best way to up their fitness and strength, but that’s simply not the case. Discover why the short sharp intense Metafit workout is one of the best ways to deliver a true HIIT workout …

Most people who claim they do high-intensity interval training often focus more on the ‘interval’ part than on the ‘high intensity’ part. Let’s get one thing straight – there’s nothing wrong with regular interval training. You do the exercise for a period of time, then rest and repeat the exercise again, thus forming intervals that are great for your heart health, circulation, and overall conditioning. But doing exercises with high intensity is where the magic happens.

Most people are drawn to HIIT because it’s short and it’s a type of cardio that doesn’t require any equipment at all to have a good total body workout. The question is, how do you know you’re doing HIIT right? Well doing HIIT on your own is very difficult and most people will never achieve the right intensity so a much more effective way is it under the guidance of a qualified Metafit coach or personal trainer.

What qualifies as high intensity?

After each interval, you should be out of breath, drenched, and thinking to yourself “Thank God it’s rest time, I couldn’t go on any longer”. Your body will treat that rest time as a quick recovery, giving you the chance to steady your breath and gather just enough energy to perform the next interval. To illustrate how hard you have to work in those short intervals (that usually last anywhere from 15 to 45 seconds), it’s worth noting that some researchers doubt that the general population could successfully adapt to the extreme nature of HIIT. However, in Metafit we challenge that belief. The general population can absolutely achieve the right intensity (90% + MHR) with expert coaching, correct programming (exercises, work to rest, duration) and determination.

Don’t underestimate the rest periods

This is such an important thing to note because people usually think that if they push themselves harder and harder with no breaks whatsoever, they will somehow achieve better results. Wrong! The rest periods are what makes HIIT work! In order to really perform at your maximum intensity, you have to give your body a chance to recover! If you just go on doing something so extreme for long, your body will slowly decrease the energy levels, which can lead to serious injuries and won’t help your fitness goals in the long run. The whole point of the rest period is to allow your body to tap into the energy supplies it has, and ‘produce’ the amount of energy you need for your next interval. Without that break, you’re not giving your body a chance to regroup and prepare itself for the hard part. Remember, it’s called high-intensity interval training, and not just high-intensity training for a reason. By going through those high cardio – low cardio intervals, you’re making the most out of your workout, whether the goal is to lose fat, increase explosiveness, or simply improve your general health.

Longer is not necessarily better

Now that we’ve established that your workout should be rough and leave you breathless and sweaty, there’s another aspect of this exercise regimen you should take into account when planning your workout – it’s length. If you’re really making your body go through intense energy bursts where you’re giving it your all, it’s impossible to perform those intervals for longer periods of time. There isn’t a professional athlete in the world that could or would want to do HIIT for an hour. You’ll come across various 45, 60, or even 80-minute ‘HIIT’ workouts on the internet that deserve a healthy amount of suspicion, to say the least.

The ideal length you should go for is anywhere between 6 and 25 minutes, no more. If you do it right, you’ll give your body an excellent, fat-torching routine that will leave you feeling energised and oh so alive! The easiest way to choose the optimal length is to simply listen to your body and find what feels good for you.

Which exercises to choose

It’s not only the way you do it but what you do that counts. You should aim for bodyweight, explosive, full body moves that simultaneously engage most of the main muscle groups in your body to get an optimal result. Giving the limiting length of the intervals, it’s hard to imagine an average person being completely out of breath by the time they finish 20 seconds of squat pulses, triceps dips or crunches. Try doing burpees, squat jumps and sprints movements and you’ll see that you’ll pretty much max out at about 20 seconds or so.

You might think that your typical HIIT workout focuses too much on the lower body, but don’t be fooled; one, quads and glutes are the largest muscles in the body, therefore they will burn the most calories when being trained, and two, in order to do a high-intensity burpee or jumping lunge the right way, you need to activate your core to keep you balanced and safe. Don’t worry, you’ll be doing a total body routine, without even noticing it or focusing on specific abs or arm exercises. That’s the beauty of HIIT.

Less is MORE

Falling in love with HIIT is easy. It’s quick, effective, and the results start to show fast – really, really fast. You might love it so much, in fact, that you’ll find yourself trying to fit the fourth or even fifth HIIT in your week, in order to achieve even faster results. Don’t do it! Aim for 2 or 3 HIIT workouts per week, max. Even just one quality HIIT workout per week will do wonders for your athletic performance. Your body needs time to recover properly; you should cherish it and work with it, not against it. Feel free to do some weight lifting, yoga, pilates or light, steady-paced cardio on your off-days. This will compliment your HIIT routine perfectly, and keep you safe from injuries and stress. If you overwork your body, it will likely recover slower than usual, causing you to have less energy to begin with, so you won’t be able to make your intervals intense and brutal, which will render your whole HIIT routine useless, not to mention the probable muscle tears and Achilles tendinitis that often go along with lower performance.

In the end, HIIT will make you appreciate what your body can do as well as boost your overall health and wellbeing, as long as you do it right. Ready, set, HIIT! 

Thanks to Metafit Australia.

Metafit is an absolute gem of a workout and is one of my all-time favourites. It's simply one of the quickest ways to visibly improve your fitness and strength. I am fully certified to teach both the standard Metafit workout and also the circuits based MetaPWR workout.

The impact of sleep deprivation on your body

A growing body of research suggests that there’s a link between how much people sleep and how much they weigh. If you’re not sleeping enough, the effects could be more significant than just dark circles under your eyes. Here we look at the surprising fact of how your size and your sleep are closely linked.

The rise of obesity over the last few decades is paralleled by significant reductions in the length of time we spend asleep.

At the same time, a large number of studies have reported associations between impaired sleep and the likelihood of developing obesity or diseases such as type 2 diabetes. (Note: the act of sleeping less does not in itself make you fat – after a few disturbed nights your body won’t automatically have created fat!).

We’re not talking about a cause/effect link here. We’re talking correlation. As the number of people getting less sleep has risen, so the number of people at risk of life-threatening metabolic and cardiovascular diseases has risen too. The reason for this correlation may lie in the effects that poor or less sleep may have on your behaviour and physiology. It’s these effects that can contribute to weight gain.

Inactivity – if you’re feeling lethargic and tired, you’re less likely to exercise and more likely to take shortcuts like using the lift rather than the stairs. This decreases the amount of calories you’re burning, which has a direct effect on your weight.

Mood fluctuations sleep is vital to regulating your mood. Less sleep could see you happy one moment and feeling low the next. Low mood can trigger emotional or ‘comfort’ eating, when our bodies crave high fat, high sugar foods. When eaten, these foods trigger the pleasure response in your brain, and we’re hardwired to crave them in times of distress.

Reduced leptin levels – less of the hormone that tells you you’re full could see you overeating without realising it.

Increased grehlin levels – more of the hormone that tells you you’re hungry will have you seeking out more food and snacks, even if you’ve consumed the right amount of food for you that day.

Recent analysis conducted by King’s College London reviewed dozens of small studies involving sleep and appetite. It showed that, although not everyone is affected in the same way, on average getting less than seven hours of sleep a night led to people eating significantly more overall.

A bad night’s sleep disrupts the two key hunger hormones, ghrelin and leptin and this combination leaves us feeling physically hungrier, causing us to eat more. Studies also suggest that when we’re exposed to food while sleep deprived, there is increased activation in areas of the brain associated with reward. This can lead to us choosing foods that are higher in sugar and fat, rather than selecting healthy options.

All of this can help to explain why, in the long term, there’s a strong connection between poor sleep, weight gain and health problems like type 2 diabetes. The simple solution is to make sure you’re getting enough sleep. For adults, 7-8 hours of sleep per night is associated with the lowest risk of incidence of cardiovascular diseases.

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EGGS: Nature’s most nutrient-dense food

“But eggs contain cholesterol!” I hear you cry, “And doesn’t high cholesterol cause heart disease?” Well, although eggs do contain cholesterol, the amount of saturated fat we eat has more effect on the amount of cholesterol in our blood than the cholesterol we get from eating eggs.

Eggs are one of nature’s most nutrient-dense foods and contain an ideal mixture of nutrients. Along with high quality protein, eggs are also naturally rich in vitamin D, B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B12, iodine, selenium and other essential dietary vitamins and minerals.

SO WHAT HAS CHANGED?
Previous limits on egg consumption have been lifted as it is now known that the cholesterol they contain does not have a significant effect on blood cholesterol.

A high level of blood cholesterol increases the risk of heart disease. It was originally thought that eating cholesterol-rich foods was an important cause of high blood cholesterol levels and therefore increased heart disease risk.  In the past it was thought that people should limit the number of eggs they eat because they contain cholesterol. However, only around a third of the cholesterol in the body comes from the diet – our bodies make the rest. It is now accepted that the amount of saturated fat that we eat has a much greater effect on our blood cholesterol levels than cholesterol in the diet.

Recommendations on limiting egg consumption have now been relaxed by all major UK heart and health advisory groups, including the British Heart Foundation and the Department of Health.

This means that most people can eat eggs without adversely affecting their blood cholesterol levels, provided that they are eaten as part of a healthy diet that is relatively low in saturated fat.

The healthiest ways to cook eggs

Boil or poach eggs (preferably without adding salt) rather than frying and avoid adding butter to scrambled eggs. Frying eggs can increase their fat content by as much as 50%.

Find out how easy it is to cook the perfect poached eggs with Jamie Oliver:

Eggs and fitness

Whenever we do any form of exercise we gain muscle – how much depends on the intensity and frequency of exercise. The more muscle mass your body has, the more calories you burn, even when resting. To build muscle mass efficiently the correct nutrients must be consumed – this is where the introduction of nutrient-dense foods such as eggs to your diet can have huge benefits.

One of the main substances our muscles need to repair and grow is protein. High in protein, eggs are an ideal choice for post-workout nutrition. Plus, in addition to their high protein levels, eggs contain all eight essential amino acids that are required for prime muscle recovery.

You can find out more information about the many benefits of eggs from the British Egg Information Service (see below).

Thanks to:

Reiki – an ancient technique for modern life

I’ve been a Reiki practitioner for the past few years now, and I’m often asked how this holistic process works and what it actually is. Understandably, sometimes people can be a little apprehensive about embarking on a Reiki treatment and wonder what they are getting themselves into! Well, here I’m happy to put your mind at rest! It’s very straightforward and simple and is usually a very relaxing and calming process – no special equipment, oils or physical manipulation is required, and it’s completely non-invasive. So just relax and enjoy …

Firstly, what is it?

Reiki is a deep relaxation technique that reduces stress and promotes healing. It re-activates the body’s natural energy system, bringing you back into balance on every level – physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually – putting your body in the best position to help heal itself.

Reiki is the healing energy, with the capacity to change lives in the most positive way. It is a gentle and effective system of healing which activates the body’s own natural ability to heal itself. It is administered by “laying on hands” and is based on the idea that an unseen “life force energy” flows through us and is what causes us to be alive. If one’s “life force energy” is low, then we are more likely to become ill, experience stress or anxiety – if it is high, we are more capable of being happy and healthy.

Reiki is a simple, natural and safe method of holistic healing and self-improvement that everyone can use. It is effective in helping many conditions, and always creates a beneficial effect. It can also work in conjunction with all other medical or therapeutic techniques to relieve side effects and help promote recovery.

The work Reiki is from the Japanese – combining rei “soul, spirit” and ki “vital energy”. 

Reiki involves the “laying on” or hovering of hands on or above the body in a non-invasive manner.

So how does it work?

The ability to use Reiki is not taught in the usual sense, but is transferred to the student by the Reiki Master during an “attunement”. This transferal of the energy then allows the student to tap into an unlimited supply of “life force energy” to improve one’s health and enhance the quality of life. Once attuned, students are aligned to the Reiki energy and can begin to channel it through their hands.

As students progress through different levels of learning, they will receive several additional attunements from their Reiki Master. Each student will have a different experience when receiving an attunement, usually a positive feeling of total peace and calm.

Here I am treating David, hovering my hands over his crown chakra.

The treatment itself is quite straightforward. You lie on the treatment bed, fully clothed. I will ask you to remove your footwear, but that is all. You can cover yourself with the blanket if you prefer. Now close your eyes and try to relax. I will begin the treatment by laying my hands on you in a non-invasive manner, usually beginning at the head, then working down to the shoulders, hands, legs, ankles and feet.

What will it feel like and how do I know it’s working?

You may feel warmth, or heat, or tingling from my hands. Sometimes a buzzing sensation. Other sensations may include seeing coloured lights or feeling as if you are floating. Sometimes people have an “emotional release” for a little while during the treatment. I have also had clients drop off during a treatment too – it’s so relaxing! Even my most sceptical clients have experienced warmth and heat and other sensations from my hands. After the session you will usually feel very relaxed and calm. People often say they sleep better that night too. It all depends on the person really.

The Reiki tradition was founded by Mikao Usui in the early 20th century and evolved as a result of his research, experience and dedication.

  • Experience peace of mind and inner calm
  • Help to relieve and cope with stress and anxiety
  • Bring a sense of balance, clarity and focus
  • Increase your energy levels
  • Enhance other treatments and medications
  • Develop confidence
  • Quicken the healing process
  • Let go of emotional baggage

A Reiki treatment is a process that anyone can enjoy in the normal course of their life and it can be used alongside other conventional or complementary treatments. The effects of the treatment tend to build up and gain momentum over time, usually around 4 to 6 weekly interval sessions are enough to produce a change, with an additional maintenance top-up every 4 weeks if you would like a long-term effect.

Reiki can help us cope with life by encouraging relaxation and bringing balance to both mind and emotions.

If you’d like to find out more, or discuss the Reiki process with me in more detail, please do get in touch, I’d love to help if I can!

My first Reiki experience

I first met Renata in a metafit session at Shipton back in 2015, and we hit it off immediately. I was interested to hear that she was going to become a metafit coach and had recently qualified as a Reiki practitioner, and when she later offered me a Reiki taster session, I jumped at the chance to give it a go.

I had an idea of what Reiki was, using energy to “heal” through the hands, and confess I was sceptical at first, but decided to approach it with an open mind. As for the actual treatment, I didn’t know what to expect from the session and this added to the overall sense of anticipation. The Treatment Room at the Raylor Centre was a peaceful haven of purple and relaxing zen-like music filled the room. It was a Sunday afternoon and very quiet and after completing a simple questionnaire, we got down to business!

All I had to remove was my shoes. The treatment couch was surprisingly comfortable and the peace and quiet and tranquil music made it easy to relax. Using a combination of “laying on hands” and hovering her hands over me, Renata worked her way around me, starting at the head and working downwards towards the feet. Almost immediately I became aware of a buzzing sensation around my face, and there seemed to be a lot of heat coming from Renata’s hands. As she moved around, I could feel the heat from her hands and the buzzing sensation around my face faded. In certain areas as she moved around I was aware of a different prickly sensation and in other areas there was no sensation at all, or just warmth from her hands.

Specifically whilst she was working around my head, I also experienced a visual kaleidoscope of moving patterns and colours, predominantly deep blue and white. I hadn’t expected to feel or see anything like this, so was surprised by the different sensations I experienced.

The session lasted just over half an hour, and I felt very relaxed and chilled at the end of it. A cup of chamomile tea at the end of the session was a very nice finishing touch and much appreciated.

I’ve since had several regular Reiki sessions with Renata, and would thoroughly recommend her. She so obviously cares about her clients and wants to do her best for you. I find that I’m sleeping well and feel I can cope much better with stress – the sessions are so relaxing it’s a pleasure to endure!

Michelle M, York.
August 2016.

What is Reiki?

Reiki is a deep relaxation technique that can help to reduce stress and promote healing, bringing you feelings of peace and wellbeing.

Reiki is Japanese for “universal life energy” and describes a system of natural healing. The Reiki tradition was founded by Mikao Usui in the early 20th century and evolved as a result of his research, experience and dedication. Reiki is a deep relaxation technique that reduces stress and promotes healing. It re-activates the body’s natural energy system, bringing you back into balance on every level – physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually – putting your body in the best position to help heal itself.

Reiki can help you to:

  • Experience peace of mind and inner calm
  • Help to relieve and cope with stress and anxiety
  • Bring a sense of balance, clarity and focus
  • Increase your energy levels
  • Enhance other treatments and medications
  • Develop confidence
  • Quicken the healing process
  • Let go of emotional baggage

A Reiki treatment is a process that anyone can enjoy in the normal course of their life and it can be used alongside other conventional or complementary treatments. The effects of the treatment tend to build up and gain momentum over time; usually around 4 to 6 weekly interval sessions are enough to produce a change, with an additional maintenance top-up every 4 weeks if you would like a long-term effect.

HOW DOES THE TREATMENT WORK?
Understandably, sometimes people can be a little apprehensive about embarking on a Reiki treatment and wonder what they are getting themselves into! Well I’m happy to put your mind at rest! It’s very straightforward and simple and is usually a very relaxing and calming process – no special equipment, oils or physical manipulation is required, and it’s completely non-invasive. So just relax and enjoy …

The Welcome Process
I will welcome you to the treatment room, ask you to fill out a simple form and have a quick discussion with you about your aims and objectives. The treatment room is darkened, soothing gentle music is played and some candles are lit. It looks like an oasis of calm and relaxation!

The Treatment
You lie on the treatment bed, fully clothed. I will ask you to remove your footwear, but that is all. You can cover yourself if you prefer. Now close your eyes and try to relax. I will begin the treatment by laying my hands on you in a non-invasive manner, usually the head, shoulders, hands, legs/ankles/feet.

The Experience
You may feel warmth, or heat, or tingling from my hands. Other sensations may include seeing coloured lights or feeling as if you are floating. Sometimes people have an “emotional release” for a little while during the treatment. I have also had clients drop off during a treatment too – it’s so relaxing!

COMMENTS FROM MY CUSTOMERS
I asked a selection of my clients to provide some testimonials and feedback about their experiences with me, which you can read below. All testimonials are featured exactly as they were written. Further feedback, testimonials and reviews can also be found on my Facebook page and website.

Renata is an extremely professional young lady with a zest for life. Her style of coaching is fun and constructive. She knows her subject and is a great inspiration. I have worked with Renata for five years and feel lucky to be part of her life.
Sean Doughty, York

I am completely converted to Reiki! After a day like yesterday, I am stunned about how well I slept and how I feel rested and calm. Thank you so much.
Susana Maia, York

Renata is a joy to work with and so obviously cares about her clients. I confess I was sceptical about Reiki at first, but now after several sessions something definitely seems to be happening! Despite major stresses in my life at the moment I’m certainly sleeping much better – it’s very relaxing and calming and a great way to chill out in the midst of a chaotic life.
Michelle M, York